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Wilfred by Jennie Farley

On my kitchen dresser stands a duck

with an orange beak
and orange bow tie.

Someone, I can’t remember who,
told me his name is Wilfred.
Wilfred is my right-hand man.

He is always ready with my shopping-list,
reminds me when my bed needs changing.
Sometimes he does the washing-up.

He was lovely to me when I had a bad cold,
plying me with hankies and cough mixture,
rubbing my chest with Vicks Vaporub

so I turn a blind eye when I find him on his back,

orange webbed feet waving in the air.

I pretend not to notice the empty gin bottle.

Every morning at breakfast while I eat my toast

he entertains me with a croaky rendition of Shenandoah.


---

Jennie Farley is a published poet, teacher and workshop leader living in Cheltenham. Her work has featured in many poetry magazines and been performed at Festivals. Her first collection is My Grandmother Skating (Indigo Dreams Publishing 2016) followed by Hex (IDP 2018). She founded and runs NewBohemians@CharltonKings, a popular arts club providing poetry, performance and music throughout the year.You can find out more information about Jennie's work on her website: jenniefarleypoetry.wordpress.com

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